October 2010 Newsletter Bookmark and Share
 This Month
October's Article: A Dedication to the Greek Diaspora Special Feature: Zakynthos: Food, Wine & Products
What's New: The Archaic Earth Stone Necklace Collection, 14k Gold Jewelry, Gold Overlay Jewelry, Greek Sterling Silver Jewelry, Collectible Greek Coins, Children's Greek DVDs, Greek Books, 2011 Kazamias Greek Almanac & Calendar Refills, Greek Music, Vintage Greek City Posters Latest Arrivals: Junior Greek & English Dictionary, Greek Food & Soaps
Featured Destination: Islands of the Saronic & Argolic Gulf - Spetses October's Recipe: Patates, Elies, Kapari Me Ladoxydo Anjouyas
Saint Namedays in October Suggestions, Comments, Subscription Info






 

Greek Flag String 16ft long

Greek Flag String 16ft long 
Indoor Greece Flag (3' x 5')

Indoor Greece Flag (3' x 5')
Mini Greek  Flag 4x6 in.

Mini Greek Flag 4x6 in.

 

Greek Flag Umbrella

Greek Flag Umbrella
Car Flag Greece

Car Flag Greece
Greek Flag Sticker Sheet

Greek Flag Sticker Sheet
GREECE rubber band bracelet (white or blue)

GREECE rubber band bracelet (white or blue)
Greek Flag Party Toothpicks 100 pc.

Greek Flag Party Toothpicks 100 pc.
Greek Flag License Plate

Greek Flag License Plate
Greek Flag Trailer Hitch Cover

Greek Flag Trailer Hitch Cover
Greek Flag Coffee Mug

Greek Flag Coffee Mug
Coffee Mug Gift Package with Greek Candy - Greece ( in Greek )

Coffee Mug Gift Package with Greek Candy - Greece
( in Greek )
Coffee Mug - Greece ( in Greek )

Coffee Mug - Greece
( in Greek )
GREECE Flag Sweatshirt Style D550

GREECE Flag Sweatshirt Style D550
Rectangle Sparkling Greek Flag Tshirt

Rectangle Sparkling Greek Flag Tshirt
Heart Shaped GREECE Flag Tshirt 1247b

Heart Shaped GREECE Flag Tshirt 1247b
Greek National Team World Cup 2010 - adidas 3-Stripe Men's Adjustable Hat

Greek National Team World Cup 2010 - adidas 3-Stripe Men's Adjustable Hat

October's Recipe:
Patates, Elies, Kapari Me Ladoxydo Anjouyas
(Potatoes, Olives & Capers with Anchovy Vinaigrette)


Don't crowd the pan, or the potatoes will steam instead of browning. To avoid this, use a 12-inch sauté pan, wok, Dutch oven, or heavy soup pot, and cook in batches. To achieve a golden brown surface, the trick is to add a little butter to the olive oil: as the butter solids caramelize, the vegetables begin to brown. If you cook in batches, however, wipe the pan clean after each one. Serve hot or warm.


Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs fingerling potatoes, scrubbed
  • Kosher salt & black pepper
  • 3-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/4 cup small, picked sprigs parsley
  • 1/2 cup small, picked sprigs dill
  • 18 whole caper berries
  • 1/2 cup capers
  • 18 mixed green and black olives, pitted and split
  • 12 whole scallions, thickly sliced
  • About 1/2 the recipe of White Anchovy Vinaigrette*

Additional Ingredients for Dressing:

  • 4 white anchovies
  • 4 shallots, thickly sliced
  • 1 tbsp small, picked sprigs dill
  • 1 tbsp small, picked sprigs parsley
  • 8 leaves fresh mint
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp dry Greek oregano
  • 1 cup distilled white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt & black pepper

Preparation:

Put the potatoes in a large pot of generously salted cold water and place over high heat. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer gently until just crisp-tender, about 7-9 minutes. Drain the potatoes and spread out on a plate. Refrigerate for at least 30  minutes and up to overnight. Cut into rustic, bite-size chunks and season with kosher salt and pepper.

In a very large skillet, sauté pan, or pot, warm the oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is very hot, add the potatoes (no crowding!). Roast the potatoes, shaking the pan, for several minutes, until most pieces turn a golden color. Add the herbs, caper berries, capers, olives, and scallions and shake the pan for 1 minute more, just to wilt the herbs and scallions. Add the White Anchovy Vinaigrette and warm through; transfer to serving platter and serve immediately.

-- Add some crumbled feta to the last batch of potatoes just before they're done, then fold all together. Or if you have some leftover fish, fold chunks of fish into this dish and serve at room temperature.

Serves about 15, as a side dish, as part of a larger spread.

*White Anchovy Vinaigrette:
In  a small food processor, combine the anchovies, shallots, dill, parsley and mint. Pulse until finely chopped but not pureed. Transfer to a bowl.

Add the mustard, oregano and vinegar. Whisk together and, whisking all the time, drizzle in the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Since this is a broken vinaigrette, it will separate quickly. Whisk again to bring it together just before serving.

Makes 1 3/4 cups


Excerpts and Photography from: How to Roast a Lamb
by Michael Psilakis



 

October's Article:
A Dedication to the Greek Diaspora

Part Two of a Two Part Series:
The Greek Americans

THE ETHOS IN A CHANGING MILIEU
Greek values exist in an ever-changing society, and Greek Americans deal with issues of identity and ethnicity in different ways. The practice of traditions and customs differs enormously from one family to another.

The issue of generational differences is discussed in a book by Alice Scourby, The Greek Americans. Historically, she says, the first generation of Greek Americans vigorously tried to preserve values from the motherland and worried about the influences of the larger American society. The second generation (those born in America but having at least one parent born in Greece) were more assimilated but often felt ambivalent about their Greekness. They felt a strong attraction to American society and often rejected certain aspects of Greek tradition. The third generation (those with two parents born in America) usually felt comfortable as Americans with their Greek heritage. In the 1960s, the American society's attitude changed, encouraging pride in ethnic background, making it easier to be both Greek and American.

The "Greekness" of the Greek-American community is also changing. Fewer immigrants are coming from Greece. In addition the number of marriages between Greek Orthodox people and those outside the faith has increased. Between 1980 and 2001 interChristian marriages fluctuated between sixty and sixty-seven percent. How do these marriages affect the "Greekness" of these couples and their children? And what makes someone Greek? How far removed can one be from one's ancestors to still be considered Greek? Fifth generation? Tenth? Do people with Greek ancestors on both sides remain Greek if they do not follow customs from the homeland or speak the language? What if someone adheres to part of the ethos but does not practice Greek Orthodoxy? These questions illustrate the diversity and change within the Greek-American experience.

The United States Bureau of the Census adopted the policy of letting people define their ethnicity themselves. It asked each American to indicate his or her ancestry. In both the 1990 U.S. Census and the 2000 U.S. Census, just over one million people claimed Greek ancestors. How has the Greek-American community maintained its identity?

PRESERVATION STRATEGIES
Strong institutions still exist today to preserve the Greek-American ethos and its dual foundations of Orthodoxy and Hellenism: the church, university academic programs, museums, and community organizations. But each institution faces the challenge of preservation and appealing to younger generations and non-Greeks.

The Greek Orthodox church has always played a major role in the movement to preserve Hellenism. The Christian religion was developed in the Greek language and influenced by classical Greek thought, entwining the two as far back as The New Testament. The church played varying roles in the Byzantine Empire, Ottoman Empire, and modern Greek state. Today in America the church sponsors Greek language schools, festivals with traditional food and crafts, camps, religious retreats, and partial use of the Greek language in the church services. However, the increase in the number of non-Greeks as a result of interfaith marriages and conversions creates questions about keeping the ethnic component such as the use of the Greek language and celebrating Greek Independence Day. Would the church grow more if the ethnic emphasis were dropped? Some would agree, but others believe Hellenism is universal and expandable. Alexander the Great remains a role model as someone who spread Hellenism beyond the boundaries of Greece. The Greek Orthodox hierarchy and community are making an effort to welcome others to Hellenism and Orthodoxy with their current interfaith effort. Yet in the tolerant, multicultural society of America, the married Greek partner, family, and community must respect the faith and culture of the non-Greek partner who may also be devoted to a different heritage.

On the secular front, Greek Americans employ different strategies to keep Hellenism alive, from the study of classics to concern for American foreign policy toward Greece. While the classics were once part of the core curriculum in higher education, the recent trend downplaying the classics and adding a more diverse curriculum has met resistance by alarmed Philhellenes (friends of Hellenes) and Greek Americans. They have begun donating money for classics chairs at universities, sponsoring lecture programs, building cultural centers and working with the Greek government and Greek nonprofit organizations to halt the erosion. Thanks to their efforts, plus the innate brilliance of the heritage, they have met some successes, resulting in a modest revival. Such efforts need to be strengthened and expanded even further in Byzantine and modern Greek studies. Preservationists are also building Greek-American museums, collecting documents such as local Greek-American histories, and writing memoirs. Cultural groups present plays and art exhibits. Politically active individuals try to influence United States foreign policy toward Greece and its neighbors. Despite all these laudable efforts, many still lament that not enough is being done. They want the next generation to visit Greece periodically, read Homer, and attend church more often.

Another preservation strategy involves staying connected with fellow Hellenes in the worldwide Diaspora (Greek communities outside Greece). Increased awareness of a shared heritage via travel, the media, and the Internet generates a sense of excitement and connection to people all over the globe who have the same values, holidays, and love for the motherland. In 1995 the Greek government established the World Council of Hellenes Abroad to facilitate cooperation and camaraderie among the Diaspora communities. The results of this effort and global communication are too new to evaluate. Will they help spread Hellenism to their host countries, or will Diaspora Greeks erect walls to keep out non-Greeks who might dilute the ethos?

Preservation strategies vary, as does the depth of involvement. After all, Hellenism and Greek Orthodoxy exist in a third context, the culture of contemporary America, which prizes choice. Most Greek Americans today think of themselves as Americans first and then choose their own depth of identification and involvement with their Greek heritage. Some Greek Americans immerse themselves solely in the church, focusing on Orthodoxy. Some Greek Americans may not be members of the Orthodox church and choose to devote themselves to Hellenic cultural activities such as language, higher education, museums, and political causes. But most enjoy participating in both religious and secular activities. In addition, they care deeply about being successful Americans who present themselves to the rest of society as model citizens in keeping with the unchanging ideals of the golden age of classical Greece and the tenants of Christianity. These diverse, individual approaches may ultimately provide the most effective overall preservation strategy. Today's Greek American proudly embodies a rich historic identity that comfortably coexists with contemporary American civilization. Each individual can balance and integrate the Hellenic, Orthodox, and American cultures in keeping with a spirit of freethinking and choice.


Greekshops Recommends:

The Greeks of Southern California, The Pioneers 1900-1942, DVD (NTSC, All Zones)

The Greeks of Southern California, The Pioneers 1900-1942, DVD (NTSC, All Zones)

 

Excerpts and Photography fromom
A Guide to Greek Traditions and Customs
by Marilyn Rouvelas

 Special Feature: 
 Zakynthos: Food, Wine & Products


Kolatsio is one of the most interesting meals in Zakynthos. It is the traditional light meal between breakfast and lunch. Kolatsio is a rest break for farmers who work the harvest of grapes, raisins and olives, an din reality it is a feast. In the old days the boss brought Kolatsio for their workers in big baskets or in bolies - large cloth napkins - filled with bread and other foods. Today Kolatsio is a full meal. It consists of reganada, which is soaked bread spread with olive oil, vinegar and chopped tomatoes as well as herring, lard, olives, tomatoes, onion from Belousi, garlic, bakaliaro - cod fish -, fresh bread and many other orektika, appetizers.

The most outstanding kolatsio is when slices of bread are dipped in soups or in ragou before dinner or into the freshly processed warm olive oil. Through the years Zakynthians have created their own cuisine which is a true melting pot. It is a colorful cuisine that belongs to the Mediterranean diet and is similar to the Omega Diet, one which is based on nutritional studies by several universities around the world, and which recently has become very popular.

After many years of research, scientists have discovered that the inhabitants of Mediterranean regions live longer because of their diet. Studies by Dr. A. Simopoulos and J Robinson have revealed that the Omega Diet fuels our bodies with food our systems expect to be fed and which our bodies require for optimum health. these foods are fish, game, vegetables and fruits. Humans throughout evolution survived with these. I am personally convinced that if we combine the Mediterranean and the Omega diets with regular physical exercise we can reduce our risk of cancer, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and depression.

The staple foods of the Mediterranean diet are bread, olive oil and wine. It is a fact that during wars people survived on those products.

Bread: Bread and olive, meant the bare necessities, but was also a slogan at these times. Bread has sustained the body and spirit through the millennia. It has been a sacred food and a commemoration of our lives, also playing a central role in our diet. According to mythology, Demeter was the goddess of crops, fruit and cereals. She was also responsible for their cultivation. Every autumn after the planting of the corn seed, Goddess Demeter was commemorated with the Celebration of the bread, one of the most important festivals of the ancient world. Everyone participated in this festivity by making breads with wheat and honey.

At the Last Supper, Christ breaks bread with his disciples in the original meal, which is reenacted with wafers and sweet wine in the Holy Eucharist of many Christian religions worldwide.

Zakynthians believe that bread is so sacred that when a piece of bread falls to the floor, they pick it up and kiss it. In Zakynthos, bread and olive oil are not only symbolically blessed elements but essential foods. Every Civilization throughout history has been based on grain; of the common grains, wheat is the most nutritious. It contains carbohydrates and every amino acid we need.

In the old days Zakynthians grew their own dark brown wheat every year, and with hard labor harvested and saved it for their own use. The good quality wheat was rare, probably available only for the well to do. Peasants typically used up all their flour by April and had to wait through spring and summer for the new harvest.

The bread was made with dough, water and basil and was given out by the priest at church the 14th of September. People kept this dough the whole year in order to make bread. Formerly, bread was baked in ovens made of clay. Today every market and bakery provides bread of various types, and many people bake it at home in modern electric or gas stoves. Either plain or combined with certain ingredients, bread is nutritious and Zakynthians eat it with all their dishes.

Pasta was as important as bread and all Zakynthians were raised with it. Accompanied with sartsa, sauce, it is a complete dish for any meal. Not only is it easy to prepare, but it is something which everybody loves.

Olive Oil: the Olive tree has been an unsurpassable source of life, inspiring artists and poets from every epoch. It is a cherished tree which has marked all the civilizations around the Mediterranean. Its oil has lit man's life and soul alike for centuries. In Greece it is believed that a few drops of oil in water are enough to ward off the evil eye. Even in the ancient Olympic games, champions spread olive oil on their bodies before they started and the winners were wreathed with crowns made of olive branches. It has been the symbol of serenity, fertility, and peace.

It was the Greeks who brought the cultivation of olives to Sicily, Italy, North Africa and Spain. For centuries, olive oil has been used to maintain the suppleness of skin and muscle, to heal abrasions, to give body and sheen to hair and to soothe the drying effects of the sun and wind. It was also a famed means of contraception. Olive oil is an irreplaceable food of man.

Hippocrates, the father of Medicine, has referred in his work to the beneficial qualities of olive oil to health in general, calling it the great therapeutic.

Scientists today have discovered that olive oil reduces the risk of heart disease, maintains metabolism and contributes to the development of the brain and bones in children. It is a source of vitamin E for older people and it also helps the digestive system and prevents gastrointestinal problems.

As revealed by a new study at the University of Oxford, the Mediterranean diet of meat, fish and olive oil is as good as a diet of fresh fruit and vegetables for keeping colon cancer at bay. Using 40 grams of olive oil lowers blood pressure. Olive oil neutralizes the acid of tomatoes and lemons and when combined with garlic it helps to digest vegetables. Zakynthians are able to use extra virgin olive oil in their everyday life. They rarely use fat or butter. Zakynthos has a reputation for a high quality of olive oil. It is an earthy heavy green, which slides like gold on the tongue because in harvesting, Zakynthians dislodge a harder greener olive with sticks and combs, believing that premature fruit yields a less acidic, sweeter oil.

In the past, horses and mules helped rotate the huge litharia, circular stones, which crushed the olives. Now automated large metal blades have replaced the stone wheels. The best moment during the new harvest of olives is dipping bread in the freshly processed warm olive oil and combining it with herring, fresh onions, fresh plum tomatoes and olives to enjoy a delicious Kolatsio.

Before electricity was introduced, Zakynthians used lamps of cotton wicks in olive oil. Today they still use them at church. They also use the oil to make soap for everyday use and a limited quantity of aromatic soaps for tourism. Olive oil is ideal for preserving foodstuffs and oiling hinges and tools.

 
The Special Feature "Zakynthos: Food, Wine & Products" will continue next month.

Excerpt from
Cooking and Traditions of Zakynthos
by Calliopi Toufidou

  What's New!
  Archaic Necklace Collection
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Sterling Silver Pendant - Trireme Ship (25mm)

Sterling Silver Pendant - Trireme Ship (25mm)
Sterling Silver Pendant - Erechtheum and Caryatids (40mm)

Sterling Silver Pendant - Erechtheum and Caryatids (40mm)
Sterling Silver Pendant - Greek Key Swirl (25mm)

Sterling Silver Pendant - Greek Key Swirl (25mm)
Sterling Silver Pendant - Medusa with Greek Key (32mm)

Sterling Silver Pendant - Medusa with Greek Key (32mm)
Sterling Silver Pendant - Ancient Tetradrachm Silver Coin with Greek Key Octagon (31mm)

Sterling Silver Pendant - Ancient Tetradrachm Silver Coin with Greek Key Octagon (31mm)
Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Band 4mm

Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Band 4mm
Sterling Silver Ring - Adjustable Greek Key Band 4mm

Sterling Silver Ring - Adjustable Greek Key Band 4mm
Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Diagonal Small

Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Diagonal Small
Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Band (2mm)

Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Band (2mm)
The Neptune Collection - Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Opal Circle

The Neptune Collection - Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Opal Circle
Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Serpent with Turquoise Square

Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Serpent with Turquoise Square
The Neptune Collection - Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Serpent with Opal Circle

The Neptune Collection - Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Serpent with Opal Circle
Greek Name Necklace with Rubber Cord

Greek Name Necklace with Rubber Cord
Greek Name Necklace with Silver Chain

Greek Name Necklace with Silver Chain
Rubber and Sterling Silver Necklace - Comedy and Tragedy Mask

Rubber and Sterling Silver Necklace - Comedy and Tragedy Mask
Rubber and Sterling Silver Necklace - Greek Key Meander V

Rubber and Sterling Silver Necklace - Greek Key Meander V
Rubber and Sterling Silver Necklace - Greek Key Meander Curve

Rubber and Sterling Silver Necklace - Greek Key Meander Curve
Rubber and Sterling Silver Necklace - Greek Key Meander Curve

Rubber and Sterling Silver Necklace - Greek Key Meander Curve
Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - Large Greek Key Links (16mm)

Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - Large Greek Key Links (16mm)
Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - 2 Sided with Greek Key and Swirl Motif (10mm)

Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - 2 Sided with Greek Key and Swirl Motif (10mm)
Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - 2 Sided with Greek Key and Floral Motif (13mm)

Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - 2 Sided with Greek Key and Floral Motif (13mm)
Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - Square Greek Key Links (12mm)

Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - Square Greek Key Links (12mm)
Sterling Silver Bracelet - Phaistos Discs (14mm)

Sterling Silver Bracelet - Phaistos Discs (14mm)
Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - 2 Sided with Greek Key and Floral Motif (9mm)

Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - 2 Sided with Greek Key and Floral Motif (9mm)
Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - Greek Key Links (9mm)

Sterling Silver Men's Bracelet - Greek Key Links (9mm)
Sterling Silver Earrings - Swaying Owl (23mm)

Sterling Silver Earrings - Swaying Owl (23mm)
Sterling Silver Earrings - Greek Key - Meander Clip On (15mm)

Sterling Silver Earrings - Greek Key - Meander Clip On (15mm)
Sterling Silver Earrings - Tragedy Masks (29mm)

Sterling Silver Earrings - Tragedy Masks (29mm)
Sterling Silver Earrings - Comedy Masks (29mm)

Sterling Silver Earrings - Comedy Masks (29mm)
Sterling Silver Earrings - Comdey and Tragedy Masks (29mm)

Sterling Silver Earrings - Comedy and Tragedy Masks (29mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Hook Earrings Blue (10mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Hook Earrings Blue (10mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Hook Earrings Pink (10mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Hook Earrings Pink (10mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Hook Earrings Magenta (10mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Hook Earrings Magenta (10mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Post Earrings Blue (6mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Post Earrings Blue (6mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Post Earrings Pink (6mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Post Earrings Pink (6mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Post Earrings White (6mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Post Earrings White (6mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Post Earrings Magenta (6mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Post Earrings Magenta (6mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant Blue (10mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant Blue (10mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant Magenta (10mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant Magenta (10mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant White (10mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant White (10mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant Pink (10mm)

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant Pink (10mm)
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Hook Earrings Blue

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Hook Earrings Blue
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Hook Earrings Magenta

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Hook Earrings Magenta
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Hook Earrings Pink

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Hook Earrings Pink
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Post Earrings Blue

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Post Earrings Blue
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Post Earrings Magenta

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Post Earrings Magenta
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Post Earrings White

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Post Earrings White
The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Post Earrings Pink

The Rio Collection - Swarovski Crystal Ball Pendant and Post Earrings Pink
   
  Collectible Greek Coins
  Children's Greek DVDs
  Greek Books
Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert (In Greek)

Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert (In Greek)
Min Pairnesi Kai Orko ston Erota, by Katerina Papanikolaou (In Greek)

Min Pairnesi Kai Orko ston Erota, by Katerina Papanikolaou (In Greek)
Agapw tha pei hanomai, by Rena Rossi-Zairi (In Greek)

Agapw tha pei hanomai, by Rena Rossi-Zairi (In Greek)
Lefki Orhidea, by Kaiti Economou (In Greek)

Lefki Orhidea, by Kaiti Economou (In Greek)
O Kipos me tis Mouries, by Kaiti Economou (In Greek)

O Kipos me tis Mouries, by Kaiti Economou (In Greek)
To Kima tou Erota, by Giannis & Maria Alexandrou (In Greek)

To Kima tou Erota, by Giannis & Maria Alexandrou (In Greek)
Agapi se meres vrohis, by Katerina Mbozoni (In Greek)

Agapi se meres vrohis, by Katerina Mbozoni
(In Greek)
Ena Gramma gia Sena Mitera, Mimika Makrigianni (In Greek)

Ena Gramma gia Sena Mitera, Mimika Makrigianni (In Greek)
Skilisies Meres, by Kostas Bostantzoglou (In Greek)

Skilisies Meres, by Kostas Bostantzoglou (In Greek)
I Istoria tis Sychronis Elladas 1941-1974 (Modern History of Greece 1941-1974), (In Greek)

I Istoria tis Sychronis Elladas 1941-1974 (Modern History of Greece 1941-1974), (In Greek)
I Apagorevmeni Istoria tis Elladas (The Forbidden History of Greece), (In Greek)

I Apagorevmeni Istoria tis Elladas (The Forbidden History of Greece),
(In Greek)
Stavroforoi Horis Stavro, by Stavros Ligeros (In Greek)

Stavroforoi Horis Stavro, by Stavros Ligeros (In Greek)
Crete: The Battle and the Resistance , Antony Beevor (In English)

Crete: The Battle and the Resistance , Antony Beevor (In English)
A Concise History of Greece , Richard Clogg (In English)

A Concise History of Greece , Richard Clogg (In English)
Cambridge Illustrated History of Ancient Greece , Paul Cartledge (In English)

Cambridge Illustrated History of Ancient Greece , Paul Cartledge (In English)
Brief History of Ancient Greece : Politics, Society and Culture (In English)

Brief History of Ancient Greece : Politics, Society and Culture (In English))
Modern Greece: A Short History, CM. Woodhouse (In English)

Modern Greece: A Short History, CM. Woodhouse
(In English)
Modern Greece : A History Since 1821 by John S, Koliopoulos, Thanos M. Veremis (In English)

Modern Greece : A History Since 1821 by John S, Koliopoulos, Thanos M. Veremis (In English)
The Struggle for Greece 1941-1949 (In English)

The Struggle for Greece 1941-1949 (In English)
Megas Onirokritis - Dream Interpreter, in Greek

Megas Onirokritis - Dream Interpreter, in Greek


The 2011 Kazamias Greek Almanac and Calendar refills are now available.
Order yours today!!
 

Greek 2011 Calendar Refill with Cooking Anecdotes (in Greek)

Greek 2011 Calendar Refill with Cooking Anecdotes
(in Greek)
Greek 2011 Calendar Refill with Saints and Religious Holidays (in Greek)

Greek 2011 Calendar Refill with Saints and Religious Holidays (in Greek)
Small Greek 2011 Calendar Refill with Poems (in Greek)

Small Greek 2011 Calendar Refill with Poems (in Greek)
Kazamias 2011 - Greek Almanac

Kazamias 2011 -
Greek Almanac
Kazamias 2011 - Greek Almanac (Ksematiasmata Edition)

Kazamias 2011 -
Greek Almanac
(Ksematiasmata Edition)
  Greek Music
Non Stop Mix 6 by Nikos Halkousis , Various Artists

Non Stop Mix 6 by Nikos Halkousis , Various Artists
Parathisos 2010 , Various Artists

Parathisos 2010 , Various Artists
Thalassa Club 2010 , Various Artists

Thalassa Club 2010 , Various Artists
H2O International Dance Mix , Various Artists

H2O International Dance Mix , Various Artists
Fresh Hits 2010 , Various Artists

Fresh Hits 2010 , Various Artists
Live + 8 Nea Tragoudia , Nikos Makropoulos (2CD)

Live + 8 Nea Tragoudia , Nikos Makropoulos (2CD)
I agapi ine eleftheri , Glykeria

I agapi ine eleftheri , Glykeria
Apo Ton Tsitsani Ston Hadjidaki , Manolis Mitsias (2CD)

Apo Ton Tsitsani Ston Hadjidaki , Manolis Mitsias (2CD)
To Kalokeri Mou , Mihalis Hatziyiannis (CD Single)

To Kalokeri Mou , Mihalis Hatziyiannis (CD Single)
Dos Mou Ligo Fos , Giorgos Alkeos (CD + DVD)

Dos Mou Ligo Fos , Giorgos Alkeos (CD + DVD)
Rixe Kati Pano Sou , Lefteris Pandazis

Rixe Kati Pano Sou , Lefteris Pandazis
Arrosto Pathos , Dimitris Kondolazos (CD Single)

Arrosto Pathos , Dimitris Kondolazos (CD Single)
Zondani Epafi LIVE , Yiannis Poulopoulos

Zondani Epafi LIVE , Yiannis Poulopoulos
I Eleni Tsaligopoulou Sti Lira , Eleni Tsaligopoulou (2CD)

I Eleni Tsaligopoulou Sti Lira , Eleni Tsaligopoulou (2CD)
Ma Pou Na Pao - Oles I Epitihies , Themis Adamantidis (3CD)

Ma Pou Na Pao - Oles I Epitihies , Themis Adamantidis (3CD)
I Megales Epitihies LIVE , Katerina Stanisi (2CD)

I Megales Epitihies LIVE , Katerina Stanisi (2CD)
Erotokritos: I Ekdohi Tis Sitias , Nikou Mamagkaki & Various Artists (2CD)

Erotokritos: I Ekdohi Tis Sitias , Nikou Mamagkaki & Various Artists (2CD)
Erofili , Nikou Mamagkaki & Various Artists (2CD)

Erofili , Nikou Mamagkaki & Various Artists (2CD)
Erotokritos , Nikou Mamagkaki & Various Artists (2CD)

Erotokritos , Nikou Mamagkaki & Various Artists (2CD)
Ta Konserta tou Nikou Mamagkaki

Ta Konserta tou Nikou Mamagkaki
To Dimotiko Tragoudi einai edo Vol. 12, Traditional Greek Folk/Clarinet Music Collection (4CD)

To Dimotiko Tragoudi einai edo Vol. 12, Traditional Greek Folk/Clarinet Music Collection (4CD)
To Dimotiko Tragoudi einai edo Vol. 15, Traditional Greek Folk/Clarinet Music Collection (4CD)

To Dimotiko Tragoudi einai edo Vol. 15, Traditional Greek Folk/Clarinet Music Collection (4CD)
I zoi mas ena glenti,  56 Greek Folk songs - Syrto, Kalamatiano, Tsamiko, Tsifteteli songs (2CD)

I zoi mas ena glenti, 56 Greek Folk songs - Syrto, Kalamatiano, Tsamiko, Tsifteteli songs (2CD)
Pame sta Klarina, 72 Greek Folk songs - Syrto, Kalamatiano, Tsamiko, Tsifteteli

Pame sta Klarina, 72 Greek Folk songs - Syrto, Kalamatiano, Tsamiko, Tsifteteli
E, Re Glentia , Various Artists (2CD)

E, Re Glentia , Various Artists (2CD)
  Vintage City Photo Posters
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Faliron, Neo Faliron (1935)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Faliron, Neo Faliron (1935)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Faliron, Neo Faliron - Ta Loutra (1930)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Faliron, Neo Faliron - Ta Loutra (1930)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Faliron, Palaio Faliro 6th Fleet (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Faliron, Palaio Faliro 6th Fleet (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Faliron, Palaio Faliro (1936)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Faliron, Palaio Faliro (1936)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, 6th Fleet in Kastella (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, 6th Fleet in Kastella (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Aerial View (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Aerial View (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, City Hall (1920)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, City Hall (1920)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, City Hall view (1930)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, City Hall view (1930)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Kanari Beach (1955)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Kanari Beach (1955)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, City Hall view (1913)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, City Hall view (1913)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Kastella (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Kastella (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Kastella (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Kastella (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Pasalimani (1927)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Pasalimani (1927)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Pasalimani (1937)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Pasalimani (1937)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Pireaus Port view (1910)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Pireaus Port view (1910)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Pireaus Port view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Pireaus Port view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Aerial View (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Aerial View (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Themistocleous Square (1904)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Themistocleous Square (1904)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Themistocleous Square (1904)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Themistocleous Square (1904)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Tourkolimano (1908)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Tourkolimano (1908)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Tourkolimano (1930)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Tourkolimano (1930)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Tourkolimano (1955)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Tourkolimano (1955)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Zea (1910)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Pireaus, Zea (1910)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Aigina Port (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Aigina Port (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Aigina Port (1963)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Aigina Port (1963)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Aigina Port (1970)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Aigina Port (1970)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Poros Port (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Poros Port (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses Bouboulinas Villa (1947)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses Bouboulinas Villa (1947)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Poros Port (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Poros Port (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses Ntapia (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses Ntapia (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses St. Mamantos (1970)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - Saronic Gulf Islands, Spetses St. Mamantos (1970)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - City of Athens, Haftia (1934)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - City of Athens, Haftia (1934)
Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - City of Athens, Ermou Street (1904)

Vintage Greek City Photos Attica - City of Athens, Ermou Street (1904)

Keep a close eye on the Greek Poster Section as it continues to expand. We are in the process of adding hundreds of Vintage City Photos and Vintage Advertisement Posters.
Above you can find a selection from the city of Athens in the Attica region.

Click Here to send a request for your favorite location.
 
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  Featured Destination: Islands of the Saronic & Argolic Gulf - Spetses (part 5 of 5)


GEOGRAPHY
Located at the entrance to the Argolic gulf, Spetses, which is also the name of its main town, is 22 sq. km. in area, has 29 km. of coast and has a population of 3,708. Some 52 nautical miles from Piraeus, the island is extremely close to the Peloponnese, being only 2 nautical miles from Kosta, from where visitors are conveyed in speed boats. There are also passenger ferries and hydrofoils from Piraeus and connections with the other Argosaronic islands, as well as with Hermioni and Porto Cheli, again by boat and hydrofoil. During the summer additional services link Spetses with Tolo, Nauplion, Leonidion, Monemvasia and three times a week with Neapolis and Kythera. Cars are prohibited on the island and the only means of transport are the bus and horse-drawn carriages. One may also travel by small caiques or by "taxi", that is speedboats departing from the harbour, Dapia, for picturesque beaches and bays. The island is rich in natural beauty and is an ideal place for both quiet and cosmopolitan holidays.
    
HISTORY During antiquity Spetses was known as Pityoussa and, as finds from excavations at Aghia Marina testify, was inhabited in the Early Bronze Age (2500 - 2000 BC). The ancient city was located at Kastelli, a short distance from the present harbour. Little else is known of the island's past history. In more recent times Spetses, like Hydra, developed to a notable naval power and, Psara, its fleet played a major role in the 1821 Revolution. Captain Laskarina Bouboulina is one of the legendary figures of the Struggle for Independence and her bones repose in the local museum. The interior of her house is preserved just beyond the harbour. The heart of Spetses is its quaint little harbour, Dapia, with its six canons, mementos of the Struggle for Independence. Restaurants, cafes and patisseries line the waterfront and throughout the day until late at night there is an endless toing and froing of people. A short distance from the quayside is the Chatzi-Yanni Mexis mansion in which the museum is housed. Exhibits include heirlooms of the Revolution, archival and folklore material pertaining to the island's past. Other sights worth visiting include the church of All Saints, the church of St. Nicholas on the road to the old harbour, the church of the Dormition of the Virgin. From Dapia one may take a small boat to several of the island's beautiful coves (Aghios Georgios, Aghia Paraskevi, Vrellos) and enjoy the precipitous northwest coast with the tiny islet of Petrokaravo or visit the bay of Aghioi Anargyroi and the Bekiri cave, haven for freedom-fighters during the War of Independence. Last but not least are the scenic bays of Xylokeriza and Aghia Marina. Directly opposite the southeast littoral of Spetses is the dazzling island of Spetsopoula, owned by the ship owner Niarchos. Excursions are organized from Spetses to Kosta, Porto Cheli and Kranidi, as well as to Nauplion and archaeological sites in the Argolid.

Next month: The Islands of the Cyclades, Part 1 of 22


 October 2010 Greek Orthodox Calendar

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
          1
Friday of the 2nd Week

The Feast of the Holy Skepi of the Theotokos

Ananias, Apostle of the 70
2
Saturday of the 2nd Week

Cyprian the Holy Martyr, Justina the Virgin-martyr of Nicomedea

Eleutherios and Roustikos, the Athenian Martyrs
3
2nd Sunday of Luke

Dionysios the Areopagite

John the Chozebite, Bishop of Caesaria 
4
Monday of the 3rd Week

Hierotheos, Bishop of Athens

Domnina the Martyr and her daughters
5
Tuesday of the 3rd Week

Charitina the Martyr

Methodia the Righteous of Kimolos
6
Thomas the Apostle of the 12

Eroteis the Martyr of Cappadocia

Makarios the Righteous of Chios
7
Thursday of the 3rd Week

Sergius & Bacchus the Great Martyrs of Syria

Polychronios the Martyr
8
Friday of the 3rd Week

Pelagia the Righteous

Pelagia the Virgin-martyr of Antioch
9
James the Apostle, son of Alphaeus

Andronicus & his wife Athanasia of Egypt

Poplia the Confessor of Antioch
10
3rd Sunday of Luke

Eulampios & Eulampia the Martyrs

Our Righteous Father Theophilus the Confessor
11
Monday of the 4th Week

Philip the Apostle of the 70, one of the 7 Deacons

Theophanes the Confessor, Bishop of Nicaea
12
Tuesday of the 4th Week

Symeon the New Theologian

Provos, Andronicus, & Tarachos, Martyrs of Tarsus
13
Wednesday of the 4th Week

Carpos, Papylos, Agathodoros, & Agathoniki, the Martyrs of Pergamus

Benjamin the Deacon
14
Thursday of the 4th Week

Nazarios, Gervasios, Protasios, & Celsius of Milan

Kosmas the Hagiopolite
15
Friday of the 4th Week

Loukianos the Martyr of Antioch

Savinos the Bishop of Catania
16
Longinos the Centurion
17
Sunday of the 7th Ecumenical Council

Hosea the Prophet

Holy Martyrs Cosmas and Damian of Arabia
18
Luke the Evangelist

Marinos the Martyr
19
Tuesday of the 5th Week

Joel the Prophet

St. Varys the Martyr
20
Wednesday of the 5th Week

Artemios the Great Martyr of Antioch

Gerasimos of Cephalonia
21
Thursday of the 5th Week

Hilarion the Great

Our Righteous Father Christodoulus, the Wonderworker of Patmos
22
Friday of the 5th Week

Averkios, Equal-to-the-Apostles and Wonderworker of Hierapolis

Seven Holy Martyred Youths of Ephesus
23
James the Apostle, brother of Our Lord

Our Righteous Father Ignatius, Patriarch of Constantinople
24
6th Sunday of Luke

Arethas the Great Martyr & Syncletiki and her two daughters

Sebastiane the Martyr
25
Monday of the 6th Week

Marcianos & Martyrios the Notaries, Chrysanthe

Tabitha, who was raised from the dead by Peter the Apostle
26
Demetrios the Myrrhbearer & Great Martyr of Thessaloniki

Commemoration of the Great Earthquake in Constantinople
27
Wednesday of the 6th Week

Nestor the Martyr of Thessaloniki

Kyriakos, Patriarch of Constantinople
28
Thursday of the 6th Week

Holy Protection of the Theotokos

Holy Martyrs Terrence and Eunice
29
Friday of the 6th Week

Anastasia the Martyr of Rome

Avramios the Recluse & his niece Maria of Mesopotamia
30
Saturday of the 6th Week

Cleopas, Apostle of the 70

Zenobios & Zenobia the Martyrs
31
5th Sunday of Luke

Amplias, Apellos, Stachyos, Urbanos, Aristovoulos & Narcissos of the 70

Nicholas the new Martyr, Epimarchos of Alexandria
           


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays, as do our custom-made Greek name mugs.
Shop among our great collection of gift ideas at our store. We also have a great selection of greeting cards
for birthdays, holidays, namedays and special occasions.

Hand Painted Icons Greek Name Mug Cups Classic Design Birthday / Humorous Message Greeting Cards in Greek Box of 12 B112
Gold and Silver Icons, and Hand-painted Icons
Greek Name Mug Cups Greeting Cards
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Complete biographies of Orthodox Saints are now available.
 

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