July 2010 Newsletter Bookmark and Share
 This Month
July's Article: Cretan Nutrition and the Mediterranean Diet Special Feature: Do You Speak Greek? The Greek Vocabulary - Pristine or Polluted?  
What's New: Pandora Style Bracelets & Natural Amber Beads, Greek Sterling Silver Jewelry, Greek Music, DVDs, Books & Software, Apparel, Food & Snacks Latest Arrivals: Greek Language Translation Software, Children's Games & Toys, Vintage Greek City & Advertising Posters
Featured Destination: Islands of the Saronic & Argolic Gulf - Aegina July's Recipe: Yemistes Piperies Florinis
Saint Namedays in July Suggestions, Comments, Subscription Info

July's Recipe:
Yemistes Piperies Florinis (Stuffed Roasted Red Peppers)


Ingredients:
 
  • 12 large firm red bell peppers (approx. 5 lbs)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 large red onions, coarsely chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 2 large garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
  • 1 cup long grain rice
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 2 cups water
  • Dash of Salt
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 2/3 cup dark seedless raisins
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts, lightly toasted
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley


Preparation:

Preheat the broiler. Wash the peppers and blot them dry with a towel. Place the peppers on a sheet pan and broil about 8 inches from the heat source, turning as they blister to roast on all sides. This should take 20 to 25 minutes. Remove and cool.

While the peppers are roasting, heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-low heat and cook the onions until wilted, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and stir for a minute. Add the rice, cinnamon, and cumin and toss to combine in the skillet. Pour in the water and season with salt. Cover the skillet, lower heat, and cook the rice until tender but al dente. All the liquid should be absorbed and the surface of the rice pocked. Remove from heat, mix in raisins, nuts, mint, and parsley and adjust seasoning to taste with salt and pepper.

When the peppers have cooled slightly, cut off their stems. Peel away their papery skins carefully so as not to tear the underlying flesh and reserve all their juices. Slit them once vertically and scrape out their seeds with a spoon.

Preheat oven to 375°. Lightly oil an oven proof glass baking dish. Fill each pepper loosely with several tablespoons of the rice mixture and fold closed. Place side by side in the baking dish, seam side up, and pour the reserved juices over them. Cover the dish loosely with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes. Remove, cool slightly, and serve warm or at room temperature.

Serves 6-8 main course servings


Excerpts and Photography from: The Greek Vegetarian
by Diane Kochilas
 
July's Article:
Cretan Nutrition and the Mediterranean Diet


The seemingly bare hills and mountains of Crete, the rocky terrain, the thick olive groves, the deceptively barren fields, even the jugged shoreline of the island constitute the wider context where a very interesting flora thrives. This flora, an evolutionary link between the flora of Asia and Africa and that of Europe, offers a wide range of endemic plants. Most of these plants find numerous culinary applications around the island: they are consumed raw in salads, boiled with legumes, meat and fish or used as basic ingredients in pies.

According to estimates, approximately 100 different species of wild greens are edible on the island of Crete.

Maratho (Foeniculum vulgare Fennel) The fennel has been known and used by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. Since then it occupies a prominent place among the cosmopolitan aromatic herbs in international gastronomy. The fennel enjoys wide culinary applications on Crete and mainland Greece. You can find it in cottage pies, mixed with octopus, cuttlefish, fish, snails, while it also marries well with legumes (.g. black-eyed beans, broadbeans) and fresh vegetables (fresh beans and artichokes).

Stamnagathi (Chichorium Intybus Chicory) The most favorite herbaceous plant in Crete. It usually grows around the coastline of the island. Its taste is sub-bitter and consumed raw in salads (with the addition of olive oil and vinegar) and is also cooked with goat's meat in eggs & lemon sauces.

Askolibri (Scolymus Salsify) This is a thistle species whose edible parts are the tender leaves and the underground white and thick roots. The askol bri are delicious with goat's meat in egg & lemon sauce.

Radikia (Chichorium chicory) This is one of the most favorite greens in the broader region of the Mediterranean basin. It can be consumed in large quantities either raw, in salads, or cooked. It is an excellent tonic for the human body. the roots, tender leaves and shoots are served cooked or raw with a lot of olive oil and vinegar or lemon juice. The sweet chicory variety is cooked with meat. A delicious Cretan salad includes chicory as main ingredient accompanied with other sweet or aromatic herbs/greens.

Avroniés (Tamus-Bryony) A plant endemic to Crete (Bryonia Cretica) that looks very much like asparagus. It tastes bitter and is usually sautéd with onion in olive oil, vinegar or lemon juice.

Askordoulàki (Muscari Comosum - Tassel Hyacinth) The edible parts of this plant are the underground bulbs. However, before they are ready for consumption you will have to soak them in water for some time. The Cretan bulbs are used in salads or cooked with lamb in the villages of the Rethymnon prefecture. If you would like to taste them, look for salads or meat dishes with Askordoulàki in their ingredients or inquire in restaurants.

Stifnos (Solanum-Black Nightshade) This is a small weed that grows in the summer months. In many parts of Greece the Stifnos is considered poisonous. However, on Crete it is consumed in large quantities either boiled or mixed with other blites and courgettes.

Glistrida (Portulaca oleracea-Purslane) This is a weed with thick succulent and fleshy leaves with smooth margins. It is a precious ingredient for Cretan salads and is also boiled in a casserole with fish or meat.

Papoùles (Pisum Sativum - Garden Pea) A pea species whose edible parts are the flat tender tops. They are consumed raw in salads. In local dialect the papoùles are also known as 'psarés' or 'kabliés'.

 

Continued next month


 

Excerpts and Photography from
Cretan Cuisine for Everyone
by Myrsini Lambraki

 


 

 Special Feature: 
 Do You Speak Greek?
The Greek Vocabulary - Pristine or Polluted?

The Greek vocabulary, like that of any other living language has borrowed,  transformed and cast off thousands of words in its long history. But. though Turks and classics professors would have you believe otherwise, this vocabulary, through years of temporary incursions and lengthy conquests, has remained remarkably conservative in its penchant to assimilate foreign words.

A fairly safe estimate as to the percentage of foreign words in the vocabulary of the average Greek speaker has been placed at 25 percent. However, the better educated, having been more incessantly drilled in classical Greek grammar and lexicon, usually can cull from a word-stock whose level of native Greek entries is considerably higher. In contrast, the English vocabulary is markedly different in content, for perhaps as much as 90 percent of this enormous word-hoard can be traced to foreign elements, due of course to the very large contribution of classical Greek and Latin, especially its French and Italian offspring, though the original Anglo-Saxon base has a very high proportion of use.

Greek borrowing began virtually from the inception of recorded history. In the second millennium before Christ, four major tribes (Achaeans, Aeolians, lonians, and later, Dorians) emerged from the Danube basin and ventured south, carrying with them a variant of Indo-European (a parent language from which most European and several Eastern languages have issued) which they foisted on the people they conquered. Evidence of the original proto-Greek exists in vestiges that cannot be traced to the language ol'the invaders. Examples are φίλος ("friend") and its counterpart εχθρός ("enemy"), Βασιλεύς ("king"), γη ("earth"), χρόνος ("time"), and Θάλασσα ("sea").

In 1952, the Englishman Ventris, working with his countryman Chadwick. succeeded in showing that documents found in Crete and Mycenae (named Linear Β by Evans a half century before) were written in an archaic Greek syllabary (composed of syllables), thus pushing the documented evidence of Greek back to at least 1450 B.C. In this modest collection we find, for example, kuruso for "gold." a word traceable to the Semitic, with cognates that include Akkadian and Phoenician, and found in its present form χρυσός· both in Iliad and Odyssey.

In the Homeric and classical vocabularies, foreign words continue to creep in. though we cannot judge their number as evidence is lacking. We do know, however, that Xenophon introduced παραδεισος ("paradise") into Greek in his Anabasis to describe the courtly gardens of the Persian kings. a word that took on the more exalted meaning found in the Holy Scriptures. But much of the spoken vocabulary of the classical Greeks is not known, or at least is vague, as mostly the literary language has come down to us through the extant manuscripts. Passages in Plato's dialogues are salient exceptions, as are the comedies of Aristophanes (which arε also the most important source of the coarse language of the period).

In the succeeding decades of the post-Classical era, the vocabulary became more simplified, as Alexander the Great spread out in the conquest of the then known civilized world. Hebrew, Aramaic and Latin were influential molders. From the Septuagint translation of the Old Testament we have new words like Σάββατον (originally "day of rest" and then "Saturday", and in English "Sabbath''), while an influx of Latin military terms left us with examples like κήνσος ("census"). During this period was formed the basis of the Koine (meaning "common" language) of the New Testament.

Throughout the medieval Greek period (which began with the creation of the Byzantine Empire by Constantine in 330 A.D.), Latin continued as a powerful force. From its classical and later forms we evidence words like βάρκα ("boat"), κάμπος ("field" and ''campus"), κάστρο ("fort", and Spanish "castro"), μάγουλο ("check") μουλάρι ("mule"), σκάλα ("ladder"), σπίτι ("house"), and φούρνος ("furnace") as well as . to the dismay of most native Greeks, σπιτάλι ("hospital").

As the first millennium drew to a close. Old French, studded with many words of Arabic and Persian origin, and mirroring the age of chivalry and the Crusades, made a small dent in the vocabulary of the period, as the Frankish Empire made its presence felt in Greece, as well as much of Europe. Examples like καπερούνι, meaning "hood" (and now with the figurative meaning of "chaperon as "protector" in Εnglish) can be found in the manuscripts (Chronicles of Morea), but virtually all of this stock is now obsolete.

At about the same time, the Venetian Empire expanded and conquered much of Greece; indeed, areas like the Ionian Islands did not gain their independence until recently. Words like αντίο ("farewell"), γάτα ("cat"). κάλτσα ("sock" or "stocking"), λίστα ("list"), μόδα ("style"), μπράτσο ("arm"), and φαντάρος ("foot soldier") have become fully naturalized, a development for (Venetian) Italian very different from the fate of its Gallic cousin.

On the 29lh of May 1453, Constantinople fell to the Ottoman Turks, bringing an end to the Byzantine Umpire, and ushering in a new onslaught on the medieval Greek vocabulary, that of Turkish. Examples of this very significant stock of words include κέφι ("good mood"), κουραμπιές ("type of pastry"), παπούτσι ("shoe"), σόι ("family descent"), τζάμι ("pane of glass"), and χαλί ("carpet"). These contributions have proved too popular to he displaced by authentic Greek counterparts.

In the third decade of the nineteenth century. Greece fought and won her independence from the Turkish yoke, only to have her language culturally enslaved by French and then by English. From the former we have words like βαλές· ("valet"), μπλε ("blue"), σπορ ("sport") and λικέρ ("liqueur"); from the later we find entries like λόρδος ("lord"), μις ("Miss." especially in a beauty contest), μποξ ("boxing event"), and τζαζ ("jazz"). But leafing through magazines like ΓΎΝΑΙΚΑ and ΡΟΜΑΝΤΖΟ would have you infer that virtually all of the French and English vocabularies have been incorporated into the Greek language.

Now we in America have been witnessing a further encroachment on the mother tongue, one that began decades ago when our fathers and forefathers landed on these shores, and one that native Greeks scoff at, albeit with (often unaware) hypocrisy. Words like μαρκέττο ('"market"), μουβάρω ("to move"), and μπόσης ("boss") have supplanted their indigenous counterparts because αγορά, μετακομίζω and προϊστάμενος are much too highfalutin for the hard working and, at best, moderately educated Greek immigrant. But what apparently escapes our scoffing sophists is that the method of assimilating foreign words on this side of the Atlantic is exactly the same as on the other, except that what they do is acceptable and what we do is ludicrous. Had they incorporated "move" it would have become μουβάρω, which like γουστάρω and φουμάρω is Italian in form and vocabulary.

Lastly many ancient words have taken a back scat in favor of other Greek words whose meanings have changed. For example, οίνος ("wine") has become κρασί from κρασίς ("mixture of wine and water"), άρτος ("'bread") has become ψωμί from ψωμός ("morsel"), while Ιπποσ ("horse") is now άλογο from άλογον (ζώον) or "irrational (animal). Similarly, some ancient Greek words have had their original meanings altered. For example, δουλεία meaning "slavery" first used by the historian Herodotrus; now in its modern dress, δουλειά means "work" or "job," while δρόμος in the Iliad meant '"running" and now is "road" or "way."

Statistically, in the spoken vocabulary of modern Greek, Turkish and (Venetian) Italian lead among the foreign influences with perhaps a thousand words each, followed by French with several hundred entries, and with English contributing a hundred or so, but gaining fast. Other sources have had a much less pronounced influence, like Albanian, which has given λουλούδι ("flower"), Spanish τσιγάρο ("cigarette"), and Slavic γούνα ("fur").

Greek speech, like the speech of most countries, is hardly homogeneous. Following the liberation from Turkish rule, Peloponnesian Greek became the favored idiom in the capital of Nauplion, and eventually in Athens after the seat of government was transferred there in 1834. But the Ionian islands, betraying a lengthy Italian conquest, reveal a vocabulary heavily laden with words of (Venetian) Italian origin, while in northern Greece, especially Thrace and Epirus. Turkish is far more prevalent than elsewhere, except perhaps Crete. while in Cyprus much more English is known.

Since the overthrow of the Greek junta, which espoused the artificial, puristic Katharevousa, there has been a renewed effort toward a simplification of the language and its vocabulary. The monotoniko orthography which allows for just one accent on words with two or more syllables (with the obsolete breathings and the circumflex eliminated), has become implemented by virtually all writers and the media. This movement appears to put less emphasis on foreign borrowing and more care into delving more deeply into the language's indigenous roots, indeed a very healthy attitude.

 
The Special Feature "Do You Speak Greek?"
will continue next month.

Excerpt from
Do You Speak Greek?
by Steve Demakopoulos

  What's New!
  Greek Sterling Silver Jewelry
Silver Pandora - Style Starter Bracelet with 3 Natural Amber Beads

Silver Pandora - Style Starter Bracelet with 3 Natural Amber Beads
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Cognac Amber Faceted (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Cognac Amber Faceted (13mm)
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Red Amber (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Red Amber (13mm)
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Yellow Amber (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Yellow Amber (13mm)
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Cherry Amber (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Cherry Amber (13mm)
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Caribbean Amber (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Caribbean Amber (13mm)
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Cream Yellow Amber (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Cream Yellow Amber (13mm)
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Green Yellow Amber (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Green Yellow Amber (13mm)
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Caramel Amber (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Caramel Amber (13mm)
Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Cognac Amber (13mm)

Pandora - Style Natural Amber Bead - Cognac Amber (13mm)
Suede Pandora - Style Bracelet with Natural Amber & Sterling Silver Beads

Suede Pandora - Style Bracelet with Natural Amber & Sterling Silver Beads
Silver Pandora - Style Bracelet with Natural Amber & Sterling Silver Beads

Silver Pandora - Style Bracelet with Natural Amber & Sterling Silver Beads
Silver Pandora - Style Bracelet with Faceted Natural Amber & Sterling Silver Beads

Silver Pandora - Style Bracelet with Faceted Natural Amber & Sterling Silver Beads
Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Athena with Helmet (17mm)

Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Athena with Helmet (17mm)
Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Ancient Tetradrachm Replica ft. Athena (17mm)

Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Ancient Tetradrachm Replica ft. Athena (17mm)
Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Phaistos Disc (20mm)

Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Phaistos Disc (20mm)
Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Phaistos Disc (15mm)

Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Phaistos Disc (15mm)
Sterling Silver Cufflinks -  Greek Key Square (15mm)

Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Greek Key Square (15mm)
Sterling Silver Cufflinks -  Greek Key Square (10mm)

Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Greek Key Square (10mm)
Sterling Silver Cufflinks -  Swirl Motif (15mm)

Sterling Silver Cufflinks - Swirl Motif (15mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Cross with Cubic Zirconia (40mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Cross with Cubic Zirconia (40mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (20mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (20mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (23mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (23mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (24mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (24mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (34mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye with Cubic Zirconia (34mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye (22mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye (22mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye (16mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Eye (16mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Circle (12mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Circle (12mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Heart (25mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Heart (25mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Heart (21mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Heart (21mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Heart with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Heart with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Heart w/ Cubic Zirconia (21mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Mother of Pearl Heart w/ Cubic Zirconia (21mm)
Sterling Silver Ring - Greek Key Band

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Heart Eye with Cubic Zirconia (31mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Heart Eye with Cubic Zirconia (31mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (23mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (23mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (22mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (22mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (25mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (20mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (20mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (27mm)

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Pendant - Eye with Cubic Zirconia (27mm)
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Bracelet - Eye with Heart & Cross

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Bracelet - Eye with Heart & Cross
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Bracelet - Mother of Pearl Eye w/ Cubic Zirconia & Cross

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Bracelet - Mother of Pearl Eye w/ Cubic Zirconia & Cross
The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Necklace - Eye w/ Cubic Zirconia & Two Crosses

The Amphitrite Collection - Sterling Silver Necklace - Eye w/ Cubic Zirconia & Two Crosses
The Clio Collection - Sterling Silver Post Earrings Minoan Dolphins (10mm)

The Clio Collection - Sterling Silver Post Earrings Minoan Dolphins (10mm)
  Greek Music
Minos 2010 Summer Kalokeri , Various Artists (2CD)

Minos 2010 Summer Kalokeri , Various Artists (2CD)
Kaftes Epitihies 2010 , Various Artists  , Mario Frangoulis

Kaftes Epitihies 2010 , Various Artists
Summer Hits 2010, Various Artists

Summer Hits 2010, Various Artists
Kalokeri 2010 , Various Artists

Kalokeri 2010 , Various Artists
Hits On Air , Various Artists

Hits On Air , Various Artists
Ola Mesa 2010 - 24 Non Stop Greek Dance Hits CD

Ola Mesa 2010 - 24 Non Stop Greek Dance Hits CD
Goal , Various Artists

Goal , Various Artists
Cafe of Dreams , Sotos Kappas (2CD)

Cafe of Dreams , Sotos Kappas (2CD)
Ta isia anapoda , George Mazonakis

Ta isia anapoda , George Mazonakis
I epohi tis agapis 2 ( Season of Love 2 )  , Mario Frangoulis

I epohi tis agapis 2
( Season of Love 2 ) ,
Mario Frangoulis
Ipoklinome , Kostas Karafotis

Ipoklinome , Kostas Karafotis
C'est la vie , Despina Vandi (2CD)

C'est la vie , Despina Vandi (2CD)
Ta pada ise esi , George Yiannias

Ta pada ise esi , George Yiannias
Tharros I Alithia , Tamta

Tharros I Alithia , Tamta
Prosopo me prosopo: Live sto stage , Eleftheria Arvanitaki (3CD + DVD)

Prosopo me prosopo: Live sto stage , Eleftheria Arvanitaki (3CD + DVD)
Dimitris Basis LIVE (3CD)

Dimitris Basis LIVE (3CD)
Yiannis Kotsiras Live 2010 (2CD)

Yiannis Kotsiras Live 2010 (2CD)
Diskoli nihta , Nikos Makropoulos

Diskoli nihta , Nikos Makropoulos
10 , Lena Papadopoulou

10 , Lena Papadopoulou
Nisiotika me ton stamati gonidi , Stamatis Gonidis

Nisiotika me ton stamati gonidi , Stamatis Gonidis
Mia fora ki enan kero , Stavento

Mia fora ki enan kero , Stavento
Na 'he kardia i monaxia , Pitsa Papadopoulou

Na 'he kardia i monaxia , Pitsa Papadopoulou
I Despina Glezou sti lira , Despina Glezou (2CD)

I Despina Glezou sti lira , Despina Glezou (2CD)
Ta iera evaggelia & imni tis orthodoxias , Petros Gaitanos (10CD)

Ta iera evaggelia & imni tis orthodoxias , Petros Gaitanos (10CD)
101 Megales Epitihies , Michalis Violaris (4CD)

101 Megales Epitihies , Michalis Violaris (4CD)
99 Megales Epitihies , Michalis Violaris (4CD)

99 Megales Epitihies , Michalis Violaris (4CD)
Al Asha Di Daham Traditional Songs of the Eastern Black Sea

Al Asha Di Daham Traditional Songs of the Eastern Black Sea
Orient Express, Instrumental Greek & Black Sea Sounds

Orient Express, Instrumental Greek & Black Sea Sounds
  Greek DVDs, Books & Software
  Miscellaneous
  Greek Food & Snacks
Aegina Pistachios Sea - Salt Roasted 200g

Aegina Pistachios Sea - Salt Roasted 200g

Aegina Sea-Salt Roasted Pistachios

Unique and delicious -- back in high demand!
World famous Aegina Pistachios imported from the Greek Island Aegina.
The unique weather conditions and special soil ingredients give the Aegina island Pistachio its exquisite taste and fine quality.
 
Evripos Greek Linden (Flamouri - Tilio) Tea in Tea Bags (10 per pack)

Evripos Greek Linden (Flamouri - Tilio) Tea in Tea Bags (10 per pack)
Evripos Spearmint in Tea Bags (10 per pack)

Evripos Spearmint in Tea Bags
(10 per pack)
Evripos Chamomile in Tea Bags (10 per pack)

Evripos Chamomile in Tea Bags (10 per pack)
Manna Barley Rusks from Crete - 400gr

Manna Barley Rusks from Crete - 400gr

 
  Latest Arrivals
  Greek Language Software
  Children's Corner
  Vintage City Photo Posters
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Andritsaina, city view (1948)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Andritsaina, city view (1948)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, city view (1935)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, city view (1935)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, Kalitisi Square (1937)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, Kalitisi Square (1937)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, Central Square (1934)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, Central Square (1934)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, Leoforos Othonos, (1947)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, Leoforos Othonos, (1947)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, Eparhio (1917)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, Eparhio (1917)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City Hall (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City Hall (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Loutra Kaifa (1955)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Loutra Kaifa (1955)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City street (1904)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City street (1904)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, City View (1930)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, City View (1930)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, Train Station area (1937)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, Train Station area (1937)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Andritsaina, City view (1910)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Andritsaina, City view (1910)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, City view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, City view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, Cathedral (1937)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, Cathedral (1937)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, Olympic Flame Lighting ceremony (1936)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, Olympic Flame Lighting ceremony (1936)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Zaharo, City view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Zaharo, City view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, Temple of Apollo (1904)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Olympia, Temple of Apollo (1904)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Zaharo, City view (1958)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Zaharo, City view (1958)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Katakolo, City view (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Katakolo, City view (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Katakolo, City view (1970)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Katakolo, City view (1970)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City view (1948)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City view (1948)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, City view (1961)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Amaliada, City view (1961)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Andritsaina, City view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Andritsaina, City view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City view (1966)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Helia, Pirgos, City view (1966)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Corinth Street view (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Corinth Street view (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Kolokotroni street view (1914)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Kolokotroni street view (1914)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Agiou Nikolaou Street view (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Agiou Nikolaou Street view (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Ag. Andreou Street (1930)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Ag. Andreou Street (1930)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, city view (1935)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, city view (1935)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, City view (1916)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, City view (1916)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, George the First Square (1930)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, George the First Square (1930)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, George the First Square (1890)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, George the First Square (1890)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Port view (1925)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, Port view (1925)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, city view (1955)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, city view (1955)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, port view (1934)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, port view (1934)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, city view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, city view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, port view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, port view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, city view (1924)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, city view (1924)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, port view (1924)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Patras, port view (1924)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Aigion, port view (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Aigion, port view (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Aigion, port view (1928)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Aigion, port view (1928)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Aigion, city view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Aigion, city view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Aigion, Alonia view (1955)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Aigion, Alonia view (1955)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, city view (1935)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, city view (1935)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Akrata, beach view (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Akrata, beach view (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, main square (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, main square (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Selianitika, port view (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Selianitika, port view (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Akrata, beach view (1934)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Akrata, beach view (1934)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, city view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, city view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, city view (1917)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, city view (1917)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, gauge rail (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, gauge rail (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, Agia Lavra Monastery (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Achaia, Kalavrita, Agia Lavra Monastery (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, city view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, city view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, main market (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, main market (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, port view/Isthmus Administration (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, port view/Isthmus Administration (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, new Corinth view (1910)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, new Corinth view (1910)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, port view (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, port view (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, city view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, city view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, city view (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, city view (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, Corinth map (1900)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, Corinth map (1900)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, Isthmus crossing (1937)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, Isthmus crossing (1937)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Port view (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Port view (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, City view (1907)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, City view (1907)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Loutraki beach (1927)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Loutraki beach (1927)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Beach / port view (1928)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Beach / port view (1928)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, City view (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, City view (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Main Road (1950)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Main Road (1950)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Port view (1934)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Loutraki, Port view (1934)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Advertising poster Loutraki Baths

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Advertising poster Loutraki Baths
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Advertising poster Loutraki Lemonade

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Advertising poster Loutraki Lemonade
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Kiato, city view (1955)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Kiato, city view (1955)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, city view (1934)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, city view (1934)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, beach view (1933)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, beach view (1933)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Kiato, Central Market (1964)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Kiato, Central Market (1964)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, Isthmus (1914)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Corinth, Isthmus (1914)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, beach view (1910)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, beach view (1910)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, city view (1955)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, city view (1955)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Kiato, Port view (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Kiato, Port view (1960)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, city view (1936)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Xilokastro, city view (1936)
Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Kiato, Port view (1960)

Vintage Greek City Photos Peloponnese - Corinthia, Kiato, Port view (1960)

 


Keep a close eye on the Greek Poster Section as it continues to expand. We are in the process of adding hundreds of Vintage City Photos and Vintage Advertisement Posters.
Above you can find a selection from The Peloponnese Helia, Achaia and Corinthia regions.

Click Here to send a request for your favorite location.

  Featured Destination: Islands of the Saronic & Argolic Gulf - Aegina (part 2 of 5)


GEOGRAPHY
Situated almost in the middle of the Saronic gulf, its harbor, Aegina, is only 16 nautical miles from Piraeus. The island, 83 sq. km. in area, 57 km. of coast, 11,177 inhabitants, has daily car and passenger ferry and several hydrofoil (Flying Dolphin) connections with Piraeus per day. During the summer months their frequency is increased and additional passenger services operate between Piraeus and the harbours of Souvala and Aghia Marina. Throughout the year there are links with Hydra, Spetses, Methana and Poros and in the summertime there are hydrofoils to Methana, Hydra, Poros, Hermioni,
Spetses and Tolon, Nauplion. A fertile island with mild climate, several flat tracts of land and some hills (highest peak Oros, 532 m. a.s.l.), it was one of the first to develop as a tourist centre. Not only has it idyllic beaches and picturesque villages, its comprehensive tourist facilities include a yacht marina in the harbor of Aegina. all in all an ideal holiday spot.

HISTORY Inhabited since antiquity, Aegina was named after the homonymous nymph, most beloved of the daughters of the river god Asopos. Its history goes far back into Neolithic times, for the first settlements on the island date to around 3000 BC, more specifically at the site of Kolona, northwest of the present town. Remains have also been found at Aghia Marina. In the Bronze Age (2500-2000 BC) colonisers arrived from Karia in Asia Minor and settled here. Shortly afterwards (2000-1600 BC) Achaeans came from the Peloponese. Finds brought to light in the course of excavations by the German Archaelogical Institute indicate that the Aeginites were involved in marine and mercantile activities as early as 1800 BC and their produce, as well as their pottery, was traded in Crete, the Cyclades and the Greek mainland. A member of the Amphictyony of Kalaureia (8th-7th century BC), Aegina was a rival of Athens and in the mid-6th century BC was the first Greek city to mint its own coinage, which had a wide circulation in commercial markets of that time until  Athens struck its own tetradrachm. Experienced seafarers, the Aeginites played a vital role in repelling the Persians during the Persian Wars, after which Athens emerged as the new naval power, sovereign of the sea. In 456 BC the island was taken by the Athenians and for short intervals also belonged to the Spartans, Thebans, Macedonians and Romans (133 BC) who sold it to king Attalos of Pergamon. In Byzantine times successive piratical raids forced the inhabitants to retreat into the hinterland where they built Palaiochora. In 1537, however, it was attacked by Barbarossa, the male population decimated and the women and children sold into bondage. The island remained deserted until it was resettled by the Turks. During the 1821 Revolution many freedom-fighters sought refuge on Aegina and in 1828 the first government of the liberated Greek state was established there.

SIGHTS-MONUMENTS In ancient times the island was famed for its school of sculpture and for the cult of Aphaia, whose sanctuary stands on an eminence some 4 km. from Aghia Marina. Twenty-four columns from the peristyle of the temple, regarded as one of the most beautiful in antiquity, are preserved, as well as part of the restored cornice and two columns of the pronaos. There are also remains of the buildings used by the priests, the propylaia and the foundation of an altar. The sanctuary was enclosed by a peribolos which included a propylon, priests house, altar and peripteral temple of the goddess with wonderful sculpted pediments in Parian marble. This decoration was removed by Prince Ludwig of Bavaria in 1813 and is nowadays housed in the Munich Glyptothek. Today all that survives of the ancient temple are a few columns and remnants of other buildings within the sanctuary. Finds from Aphaia, as well as from other historical sites on the island, are exhibited in the Archaeological Museum in the main town. Ruins of the Archaic temple of Apollo still survive at Kolona, while at the port there are remnants of the ancient harbor installations. In the immediate vicinity of the town, on the way to the village of Achioi Asomatoi (1.5 km) stands the church of Sts. Theodore of Omorphi Ekllesia (Lovely church), founded in 1282 by an Athenian family and adorned with important wall paintings. Also significant is the church of the Domitian of the Virgin in the monastery of that name in the village of Tsikides (6km. south of Aegina). Of the many monasteries and churches on the island that most frequently visited is St. Nektarios (6 km. east of Aegina), built in 1904 by the Bishop Pentapoleos who died there in 1920 and was canonized in 1961. On the 9th of November, the anniversary of his death, pilgrims flock to the island. The nearby monastery of St. Catherine stands on the site of an ancient temple of Aphrodite and a short distance beyond, the Byzantine town of Palaiochora where the islanders sought protection from marauding pirates during the 9th and 10th centuries.

To the north of Paliochora (approx. 5 km.) is the region of Souvala, one of the island's many holiday resorts from where one can visit Aghioi, Vaia and Mesagro, a village with a tradition of pottery making. About 6 km. south of this village is Aghia Marina, very popular with holidaymakers because of its sparkling sea and characteristic island atmosphere. West of Aghia Marina is the village of Alones and on the southwest coast of the island (approx. 10 km. from Aegina) the quaint fishing village of Perdika from where one can take a boat to the opposite islet of Moni with its lush vegetation. All the beaches on the island (north and south) are accessible by local bus and are fine for swimming and fishing. There is a daily boat service between Aegina and the neighboring isle of Angistri, another favorite tourist haunt, particularly during the summer months. Aegina is equipped to cater for visitors; there are several hotels (many in town, by the harbour and at Aghia Marina), as well as rooms and apartments for rent.

Next month: The Islands of the Saronic and Argolic Gulf, Part 3 - Poros


 July 2010 Greek Orthodox Calendar

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
        1
Cosmas & Damian the Holy Unmercenaries

Constantine the New Martyr of Cyprus

Nicodemos of the Holy Mountain
2
Deposition of the Precious Robe of the Theotokos in Vlachernae

St. Juvenal, Patriarch of Jerusalem

Juvenal the Protomartyr of America & Alaska
3
6th Saturday after Pentecost

Hyacinth the Martyr of Caesarea & Theodotos and Theodota the Martyrs

Anatolios, Patriarch of Constantinople
4
6th Sunday of Matthew

Andrew of Crete Author of the Great Canon

St. Martha, mother of St. Symeon Stylites the Younger
5
Athanasios of Mount Athos

Righteous Father Lampadus the Wonderworker

Kyprianos the New Martyr of Koutloumousiou Monastery
6
7th Tuesday after Pentecost

Sisoes the Great

Holy Apostles Archippus, Philemon and Onesimus
7
Kyriaki the Great Martyr

Thomas the Righteous of Malea

Akakios of Sinai
8
Prokopios the Great Martyr & his mother Theodosia the Martyr

Theophilios the Myrrhbearer of Pantokrator Monastery

Appearance of the Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos of Kazan
9
7th Friday after Pentecost

Pancratios, Bishop of Sicily

Dionysios the Orator
10
7th Saturday after Pentecost

45 Holy Martyrs of Nikopolis, Armenia

Our Holy Father Gregory, Bishop of Assa
11
7th Sunday of Matthew

Euphemia the Great Martyr

The All-Praised Olga, Equal-to-the-Apostles, Princess of Kiev
12
8th Monday after Pentecost

Proklos & Hilarios the Martyrs of Ancyra

Our Holy Father Michael of Maleinus
13
8th Tuesday after Pentecost

Synaxis of Archangel Gabriel

Stephanos of Saint Savvas Monastery
14
8th Wednesday after Pentecost

Aquila the Apostle among the 70

Our Holy Father Joseph the Confessor, Archbishop of Thessalonica
15
Julitta & Kyrikos the Martyrs

Vladimir, Equal-to-the-Apostles of Kiev

The Finding of the Head of St. Matrona of Chios
16
8th Friday after Pentecost

Athenogenes the Holy Martyr of Heracleopolis

Julia the Virgin-martyr of Carthage
17
Marina the Great Martyr of Antioch

Veronika & Speratos the Martyrs

18
Sunday of the Holy Fathers

Emilianos of Bulgaria

Holy Martyrs Paul, Thea and Oulalentine
19
9th Monday after Pentecost

Macrina the Righteous, sister of St. Basil

Dios, Abbot of Antioch
20
Elias the Prophet
21
9th Wednesday after Pentecost

Symeon the Fool for Christ

Parthenios, Bishop of Arta
22
Mary Magdalene, Myrrhbearer & Equal-to-the-Apostles

Markella, the Virgin-martyr of Chios
23
9th Friday after Pentecost

Phocas the Holy Martyr, Bishop of Sinope

Ezekiel the Prophet
24
9th Saturday after Pentecost

Christina the Great Martyr of Tyre

Athenagorus the Apologist
25
9th Sunday of Matthew

Dormition of St. Anna, mother of the Theotokos

Olympias the Deaconess
26
Paraskevi the Righteous Martyr of Rome

Hermolaos the Holy Martyr & his Companions

St. Prisca, the Righteous Martyr
27
Panteleimon the Great Marytr & Healer

St. Nicholas of Novgorod, the fool-for-Christ

Anthoussa the Righteous Confessor
28
10th Wednesday after Pentecost

Prochoros, Nicanor, Timon, & Parmenas the Apostles of the 70

Irene the Righteous of Chrysovalantou
29
10th Thursday after Pentecost

Kallinikos the Martyr of Asia Minor

Theodote and her Children
30
10th Friday after Pentecost

Silas & Silvanos the Apostles of the 70

St. Julitta of Caesaria
31
10th Saturday after Pentecost

Forefeast of the Precious Cross

Joseph the Righteous of Arimathea


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays, as do our custom-made Greek name mugs.
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