February 2009 Newsletter
 This Month 
Greek Culture Article: Monastiraki Square Special Feature: NEW Silver Greek Jewelry!
What's New: Romantic Gifts, Music, Books & More! Featured Destination: Leros 
Saint Namedays in February February's Recipe: Garídes Me Méli (Honey-glazed Shrimp)
Suggestions & Comments / Subscription Info New Ancient Replicas T-Shirt, Music, DVDs, and more!

Ingredients:
2 Tbs. Greek extra virgin olive oil
1 lb/500 g shrimp, boiled/peeled
4 Tbs. fish sauce
2 Tbs. fresh oregano, finely chopped
2 Tbs. honey
Freshly ground black pepper
 
Preparation:
Heat the olive oil, fish sauce, and honey in a pan, add the shrimp, and sauté gently for 5 minutes, until soft. Remove the shrimp from the pan and leave in a warm place. Reduce/thicken the sauce and add the oregano. Now pour the sauce over the shrimp and sprinkle with pepper. Serve as an appetizer with freshly baked bread and a salad.
 

In the coastal villages of Epirus, especially those near the Ambracian Gulf, there is frantic activity among the fishermen on clear spring nights when the moon is full. This is the center of shrimp fishing, and here lie the main fishing beds for Greek shrimp. Even back in the times of Ancient Greece, Athenaeus of Naucratis, in his work Deipnosophistae or "The Gastronomers," described karis (as shrimp was called in those times) as a popular delicacy. Today, the best place to get fresh shrimp in Greece are the fish markets in major cities, or direct locally on the coast, where they can be enjoyed in the small harbor inns fresh from the sea.
 
Excerpt from: Culinaria Greece by Marianthi Milona
 


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Greek Culture Article
Monastiraki Square
Monasiraki SquareMonastiraki (meaning "little monastery", since there once stood a monastery on this site from the 11th to 16th centuries) is a very old historical section of Athens with remnants still standing among present-day modernity. It is a noisy, bustling hub where east meets west, filled with street vendors selling anything from lighters to jewelry, and waiters dashing across streets balancing trays of souvlaki or Greek coffee for patrons. The tiny streets around Monastiraki also have character, which we will soon visit. Be sure to check out the fabulous graffiti on one of the building's walls. It was designed by Alexandros Vasmoulakis, a graffiti artist who was commissioned to decorate various cityscapes for the Athens 2004 Olympics. For several decades, Monastiraki had lost its beauty and became a rather gloomy site. The square is currently undergoing construction, and its new facelift restore its image, both historically and archaeologically.

Street Map of Monastiraki Square

Monasiraki SquareFlea Market - Yusurum
Monastiraki is known for its flea market, to Pazari, and its a bit confusing because there are actually two markets to visit. The first is often referred to as Yusurum, a name derived from a Jewish antique trader. This market starts at Monastiraki Square and continues down the street to Agios Phillippos and Abyssinia Square. You can find a number of small shops that ore open daily and sell both old and new clothes and numerous old objects such as coins, metals, plates, old book
s, records and jewelry.

Monasiraki SquareThe other market is the big flea market that has been in existence since 1910 and takes place every Sunday here. You need to arrive early because it becomes very crowded around 11:00am. There are so many things for sale, from Greek antiques to modern day gadgets and furniture. It is really a lot of fun spending your Sunday morning here! And even better, the act of bargaining is very acceptable and truly the norm.

Panagia Pantanassa - Virgin Mary Queen Of All
While you are walking around Monastiraki, you will notice a rather small church. It is Called Panagia Pantanassa (the Virgin Mary Queen Of All). It used to be known as the Great Monastery and this is how the square took its name. Monasiraki: Panagia PantanassaThe original monastery probably dated back to the 11th century and stretched from Athinas to Aiolou Streets. When the first metro was developed in 1896, the monastery buildings were demolished. It was a very important church up to this time, but lost its importance after construction. The three-aisled, barrel-vaulted church that exists today was built in the 17th century. It formally belonged to the Monastery of Kaissariani on Hymittos Mountain and first served as a women's monastery. Later it became the Great Monastery and was known for its textile production. During the early 20th century, the church underwent repairs and also received a tall bell tower. Even today, conservation and repair work continue on this tiny, historical church.

Monasiraki: Panagia PantanassaMonastiraki Metro
While in Monastiraki, you really must take a look at another archaeological gem, the Metro Station. This station is unique, for it is here that you can actually view the bed of the Eridanos River, dating back to antiquity. The Eridanos River began at Lycavittos Hill, then through the Ancient Agora to the site of Keramikos where it is still visible today. Since Roman days - 200 AD - it had been covered with a clay roof and used as a sewer. Monasiraki Archeological SiteRediscovered during the start of excavations in 1992, this amazing exhibit displays the remains of three different periods of time, two of which are Roman and one of the Paleochristianic. The archaeological site is covered with a specially designed glass casing and has an attached pedestrian corridor that you can walk on top of to get a closer view. Monastiraki is the last station of the Attiko Blue Line (Line 3) and serves as a changing point to Line 1 (Kifissia-Piraeus).

Tsisdarakis Mosque - Museum of Ceramics
Another interesting site in Monastiraki Square is the Tsisdarakis Mosque. Very few mosques have remained from the four centuries that Greece Was under Turkish rule. After liberation, the Greeks wanted to erase all traces of this difficult period, Monasiraki: Panagia Pantanassaso they destroyed the majority of buildings from this era. You can, however, find this mosque in the heart of Monastiraki. It was built in 1759 by Mustafa Aga Tsisdarakis. At one time there was a minaret next to it, but this too was destroyed after Greece was freed from the Turks. After Greek independence, the building was used for different purposes and has functioned as a guardhouse, a prison, a military camp and a warehouse.

In 1915, it was restored by Anastasios Orlandos. Three years later it became the Museum of Greek Handicrafts, and in 1923 renamed the National Museum of Decorative Arts. In 1959, it became the Museum of Greek Folk Art. In l973, the museum transferred to another location and the mosque was used as an auxiliary building that housed collections of Greek ceramics. Ten years later it reopened again as the Museum of Ceramics. Be sure to stop by; you will get an idea of what the inside of a mosque is like, and you will also see a fine collection of folk ceramics and pottery.
 

Angelyn Balodimas-Bartolomei Ph.D - Footsteps Through AthinaWant to know more about
the best locations in Athens?

New to our collection this month is Angelyn Balodimas-Bartolomei's "Footsteps Through Athina: A Traveler's Guide to Athens and Greek Culture"

Its 260 pages are packed with intriguing facts, descriptions, and hidden secrets sure to delight anyone travelling to Athens. Even if you've spent a lot of time there, this book is sure to teach you things you never knew - stories hidden under the surface of the streets you know and love.

Athens is a city of antiquity yet also an ever-changing metropolis of modernity. This comprehensive and informative guide to the original City of Democracy will help you navigate the neighborhoods, streets and landmarks like a native - including sights often overlooked by most visitors. You'll be well on your way to discover the rich Greek culture that has influenced the Western World. It even includes useful Greek phrases, and a culture chapter.

 Special Feature: Romantic Gifts!
 New Sterling Silver Greek Jewelry
New Sterling Silver Greek Jewelry
 
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Bracelet

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Bracelet
 
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Earrings

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Earrings
 
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Dangle Earrings

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Dangle Earrings

 
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Dangle Earrings

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Dangle
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Jemstone Bracelet

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Gemstone Bracelet
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace

 
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Jemstone Bracelet

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Gemstone Bracelet
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Dangle Earrings

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Dangle Earrings
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace with Jemstone

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace with Gemstone
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace with Gemstone

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace with Gemstone

 
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace with Jemstone

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace with Gemstone
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Dangle Earrings

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart-Shaped Dangle Earrings
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace with Jemstone

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace with Gemstone

 
Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace

Sterling Silver Greek Key Heart Pendant Necklace
 What's New!
 Silver Wall Icons for Children
Sterling Silver Icon of Virgin Mary for Baby Room Wall

Sterling Silver Icon of Virgin Mary for Baby Room Wall
 
Sterling Silver Icon of Virgin Mary for Baby Room Wall

Sterling Silver Icon of Virgin Mary for Baby Room Wall
Sterling Silver Icon of Jesus for Baby Room Wall

Sterling Silver Icon of Jesus for Baby Room Wall
 
Sterling Silver Icon of Stylianos for Baby Room Wall

Sterling Silver Icon of Stylianos for Baby Room Wall
 Music
 Children's DVDs
H Tenia Mias Melissas (Bee Movie) DVD (PAL/Zone 2)

H Tenia Mias Melissas (Bee Movie) DVD (PAL/Zone 2)
 
Orea Kimomeni (Sleepiung Beauty) Platinum Ed. DVD (PAL/Zone 2)

Orea Kimomeni (Sleepiung Beauty) Platinum Ed. DVD (PAL/Zone 2)
 
Kung Fu Panda DVD (PAL/Zone 2)

Kung Fu Panda DVD (PAL/Zone 2)
 
WALL-E (GOUOL-I ) 2-DVD (PAL/Zone 2)

WALL-E (GOUOL-I ) 2-DVD (PAL/Zone 2)
 
Shrek the Third DVD (PAL/Zone 2)

Shrek the Third DVD (PAL/Zone 2)
The Little Mermaid: Ariel

The Little Mermaid: Ariel's Beginning - DVD (PAL/Zone 2)
 
101 Dalmations (Ta 101 Skilia Tis Dalmatias) 2-DVD Platinum Ed. (PAL/Zone 2)

101 Dalmations (Ta 101 Skilia Tis Dalmatias) 2-DVD Platinum Ed. (PAL/Zone 2)

 
Tinker Bell DVD (PAL/Zone 2)

Tinker Bell DVD (PAL/Zone 2)
 
 Travel DVDs
Discover Greece: The Extraordinary Greece - DVD (NTSC/PAL)

Discover Greece: The Extraordinary Greece - DVD (NTSC/PAL)
Discover Greece: The Best of Greece - DVD (NTSC/PAL)

Discover Greece: The Best of Greece - DVD (NTSC/PAL)
Discover Greece: Mediterranean - DVD (NTSC/PAL)

Discover Greece: Mediterranean - DVD (NTSC/PAL)
 
Discover Greece: Crete - DVD (NTSC/PAL)

Discover Greece: Crete - DVD (NTSC/PAL)
 
Discover Greece: Land of the Gods - Peloponnisos DVD (NTSC/PAL)

Discover Greece: Land of the Gods - Peloponnisos DVD (NTSC/PAL)
Discover Greece: Cyclades Islands - DVD (NTSC/PAL)

Discover Greece: Cyclades Islands - DVD (NTSC/PAL)
Discover Greece: Epirus - DVD (NTSC/PAL)

Discover Greece: Epirus - DVD (NTSC/PAL)
 
Discover Greece: Corfu - DVD (NTSC/PAL)

Discover Greece: Corfu - DVD (NTSC/PAL)
 
 Ancient Greek Replicas
Discus Thrower Statue (40" / 102 cm.) Bronze-colored

Discus Thrower Statue (40" / 102 cm.) Bronze-colored
Discus Thrower Statue (20" / 42 cm.) Ivory-colored

Discus Thrower Statue (20" / 42 cm.) Ivory-colored
Poseidon (or Zeus) Statue 18" (46 cm) Bronze-colored

Poseidon (or Zeus) Statue 18" (46 cm) Bronze-colored
 
Poseidon (or Zeus) Statue 18" (46 cm) Ivory-colored

Poseidon (or Zeus) Statue 18" (46 cm) Ivory-colored
Cycladic Devotion Idol (20 cm)

Cycladic Devotion Idol (20 cm)
Discus Thrower Statue (20" / 42 cm.) Ivory-colored

Discus Thrower Statue (20" / 42 cm.) Ivory-colored
Discus Thrower Statue (20" / 42 cm.) Bronze-colored

Discus Thrower Statue (20" / 42 cm.) Bronze-colored
Discus Thrower Statue 9" (23 cm.) White-colored

Discus Thrower Statue 9" (23 cm.) White-colored
 
Discus Thrower Statue 9" (23 cm.) Bronze-colored

Discus Thrower Statue 9" (23 cm.) Bronze-colored
Delphi Tholos of Athena Pronoia Temple 7" (18 cm)

Delphi Tholos of Athena Pronoia Temple 7" (18 cm)
Medousa Mask (6")

Medousa Mask (6")
 
Warrior Mask (6")

Warrior Mask (6")
Ionian Picture Frame (for 4" x 5" photo)

Ionian Picture Frame (for 4" x 5" photo)
Corinthian Picture Frame (for 4" x 5" photo)

Corinthian Picture Frame (for 4" x 5" photo)
 
Caryarides Picture Frame (for 4" x 5" photo)

Caryarides Picture Frame (for 4" x 5" photo)
 
Twelve Gods of Olympus Clock (10" diameter)

Twelve Gods of Olympus Clock (10" diameter)
 
Ionian Column Table Clock (8x10")

Ionian Column Table Clock (8x10")
Apollo Table Clock (8x10")

Apollo Table Clock (8x10")
Plato Bust 9" (23 cm) Bronze Color

Plato Bust 9" (23 cm) Bronze Color
Hermes Bust 8" (20 cm) Bronze Color

Hermes Bust 8" (20 cm) Bronze Color
Socrates Bust 8" (20 cm) Bronze Color

Socrates Bust 8" (20 cm) Bronze Color
Socrates Bust 8" (20 cm) Ivory Color

Socrates Bust 8" (20 cm) Ivory Color
Plato Bust 12" (31 cm) Bronze Color

Plato Bust 12" (31 cm) Bronze Color
 
   
 Amber Worry Beads
  Authentic Amber Worrybeads
 
Natural Amber Classic Worrybeads approx. 57gr. AM1

Natural Amber Classic Worrybeads approx. 57gr. AM1

Natural Black Amber Worrybeads approx. 34gr. AM9

Natural Black Amber Worrybeads approx. 34gr. AM9

Natural Amber Citron Worrybeads approx. 61gr. AM5

Natural Amber Citron Worrybeads approx. 61gr. AM5

Natural 100% Amber Particle Cherry Worrybeads approx. 33gr. AMD12

Natural 100% Amber Particle Cherry Worrybeads approx. 33gr. AMD12
 
 Silver Worry Beads
 Greek Soccer Team & Patriotic Worry Beads
Olympiakos Worrybeads

Olympiakos Worrybeads
A.E.K. Worrybeads

A.E.K. Worrybeads
 
Panathinaikos Worrybeads

Panathinaikos Worrybeads
P.A.O.K. Worrybeads

P.A.O.K. Worrybeads
Greek Flag Worrybeads

Greek Flag Worrybeads
 New T-Shirt and Sweatshirt Designs!

E.U. (European Union) Tshirt

E.U. (European Union)

  

Santorini Island Tshirt

Santorini Island

  

Greek Island Creta (Crete) Tshirt

Greek Island Creta (Crete)

  

Cyprus Island Sweatshirt

Cyprus Island

  

The Death of Socrates Tshirt

The Death of Socrates

  
 Vancouver 2010 Collector's Pins
 Romantic Gifts

Click here to view more romantic gifts!
(Order your Valentine's Day gifts now to assure timely delivery for February 14th!)

  Featured Destination: Leros


Leros Island MapGEOGRAPHY:
Leros, situated between Kalymnos and Patmos, has a strange beauty. It is 53 sq. km. in area, has 71 km. of coastline, 8,127 inhabitants and is 178 nautical miles from Piraeus. There is a car and passenger ferry from Piraeus and a connection with the rest of the Dodecanese and Crete. The boat to the outlying islands on the Piraeus - Kavala route links it with Pholegandros, Anaphi, Santorini, the rest of the Dodecanese, the islands of the north and east Aegean, Crete and KavaIa. There is a local service to Patmos, Arkoi, Leipsoi, Agathonisi, Samos, Kalymnos, Kos, Nisyros, Telos, Symi, Rhodes; and from Aghia Marina to Patmos, Leipsoi, Arkoi and Agathonisi. In the summer a hydrofoil operates between Leros and Rhodes, Kos, Patmos, Samos. There is an airplane from Athens, Kos and Rhodes. The island's capital is Aghia Marina and its main port is Lakki. There are small settlements all over Leros which is traversed by a series of hills with small fertile plains and valleys between, like the inlets in its bays. The coastline follows the lie of the land and is indented with bays and coves, little harbors and headlands. The varied landscape, healthy climate and quiet way of life make Leros a good venue for restful holidays.

HISTORY: The island was inhabited in Neolithic times, as evident from traces preserved in the region of Partheni. In antiquity it was known, together with Kalymnos, as the Kalydnai isles or Kalydna. Archaeological remains scattered throughout the island testify to its, continuous habitation in ancient times. The island seems to have taken part in the Trojan War and later became a member of the Alliance of Ionian cities, centered on Miletus. Due to its safe harbors it enjoyed economic and commercial prosperity until the Roman conquest, after which its fate was the same as the other islands of the archipelago. In 1316 it was sold to the Knights of the Order of St. John and belonged administratively to Kos. In 1522 it was captured by the Turks who remain until 1912 when it passed to the Italians. They transformed it into a naval base and as a consequence it suffered heavy bombing during the Second World War. In 1948 it was incorporated in Greece and in recent times was place of exile for political prisoners.

SIGHTS - MONUMENTS: The island's capital today, Aghia Marina, is built in about the middle of its east side and actually comprises three settlements adjacent to each other, Aghia Marina, Platanos, and Panteli. This is the main traditional village on the island with its brilliant white houses and narrow alleyways in the old quarter, its Neoclassical mansions a massive Venetian castle. The most import monument is the castle built on the eastern edge of the town. It occupies the site of the ancient acropolis and acquired its present aspect during the time of the Knights. This castle was also important in the preceding Byzantine period and it was here that Hosios Christodoulos, founder of the Monastery of St. John on Patmos, first arrived. It is to him that the destruction of all the ancient edifices and temples, extant until then (11th century) is attributed. When the Knights of St. John acquired the island (14th century) they repaired and enlarged the castle. Nowadays the restored enceinte survives and within its precincts is church of the Virgin of the Kastro, original the katholikon of a monastery, as evident from the ruined cells all round it. There are al ruins of various buildings and houses, fort castle was inhabited up until the 18th century.

Behind the castle stand the windmills. Other places of interest include the Public Library, in which a small archaeological collection is housed, the church of St. Paraskevi and a few buildings in which the local vernacular architecture is combined with Neoclassical elements.

Southwest of Aghia Marina (4 km.) is Lakki, the island's main harbor, built at the far end of a sheltered bay. During the Italian occupation it served as a naval base and the Italians supervised the painting of the town with its wide streets and gardens. Many Bauhaus style buildings were built at this time. The churches of St. John the Theologian, St. Spyridon, St. George and St. Zacharias are of interest. Further south, at Xerokampos (8 km. south of e capital) the ancient acropolis of the 4th century BC is located on top of hill. A medieval fortress was also erected here, though this has w been completely destroyed.

Leros: Aghia Marina, the harbor and the castleNorthwest of Aghia Marina (5 km.) is Alinda seaside village in the midst of greenery. Just north of here (9 km. northwest of Aghia Mari is Partheni, a tiny village on the creek of homonymous gulf, surrounded by trees. name is evidently derived from the ancient word Parthenos (chaste), an epithet of the goddess Artemis who, we gather from literary sources and inscriptions, was worshipped here. The church of the Virgin Kioura merits a visit.

The loveliest beaches on Leros are on its east side -at Aghia Marina, Panteli, Vromolithos, Alinda- and can be reached on foot or by car. The northern coast is rockier with small sandy coves- Aghios Stefanos at Partheni, Blefountis bay. The south shores of the island -Lakki, Merikia, Xerokampos- can be reached by car or caique from Aghia Marina and have stretches of sand both large and small. There is a large beach at Gourna on the west side of Leros.

The harbors and anchorages on Leros are ideal for private craft and the island is surrounded by uninhabited islets where the fishing is excellent. Refueling facilities at Lakki. Although accommodation is available in hotels, pensions, rooms and apartments there is often a problem of where to stay during the summer season.

 Saints' Name Days in February~ Greek Orthodox Calendar

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1
Sunday of the Canaanite

Forefeast of the Presentation of Our Lord and Savior in the Temple

Tryphon the Martyr
2
The Presentation of Our Lord and Savior in the Temple

Gabriel the New Martyr of Constantinople

Jordan the New Martyr
 3
Tuesday of Publican and Pharisee

Symeon the God-Receiver, Anna the Prophetess

Stamatios, John, & Nicholas, New Martyrs of Chios
 
 4
Wednesday of Publican and Pharisee

Isidore of Pelusium

Nicholas the Confessor
5
Thursday of Publican and Pharisee

Agatha the Martyr

Polyeuktos, Partriarch Of Constantinople
6
Friday of Publican and Pharisee

Photios, Patriarch of Constantinople

Bucolos, Bishop of Smyrna
7
Saturday of Publican and Pharisee

Parthenios, Bishop of Lampsakos

Luke the Righteous of Greece
8
Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee: Triodion Begins Today

Theodore the Commander & Great Martyr

Zechariah the Prophet
 
9
Monday of Prodigal Son

Leavetaking of the Presentation of Our Lord and Savior in the Temple

Nicephoros the Martyr of Antioch
10
Haralambos the Holy Martyr

Anastasios, Patriarch of Jerusalem

Porphyrios & Baptos the Monk-martyrs
11
Wednesday of Prodigal Son

Vlassios the Holy Martyr of Sebaste

Theodora the Empress
12
Thursday of Prodigal Son

Meletios, Archbishop of Antioch

Antonius, Archbishop of Constantinople
13
Friday of Prodigal Son

Martinianos the Righteous

Aquilla & Priscilla the Apostles
14
Saturday of Prodigal Son

Holy Father Auxentius of the Mountain

Cyril, Equal-to-the-Apostles & Teacher of the Slavs
15
Sunday of Prodigal Son

Onesimus the Apostle of the 70

Our Righteous Father Anthimus the Elder of Chios
 
16
Pamphilios the Martyr & his Companions

Flavianos, Patriarch of Constantinople
17
Theodore the Tyro, Great Martyr

Mariamne, sister of Apostle Philip
18
Leo the Great, Pope of Rome

Agapetus the Confessor, Bishop of Sinai
19
Philemon & Archippos, Apostles of the 70

Philothea the Righteous Martyr of Athens
 
20
Leo, Bishop of Catania

Agathus, Pope of Rome
21
Saturday of Souls

Timothy the Righteous

John III, Patriarch of Constantinople
22
Judgment Sunday

Finding of the Relics of the Holy Martyrs of Eugenios

Our Righteous Fathers Thalassius and Baradatus
 
23
Polycarp the Holy Martyr & Bishop of Smyrna

Proterios, Archbishop of Alexandria
24
First & Second Finding of the Venerable Head of John the Baptist

Romanos, Prince of Uglich
25
Tarasios, Patriarch of Constantinople

Reginos, Bishop of Skopelos
26
Porphyrios, Bishop of Gaza

Photini the Samaritan Woman & her martyred sisters: Anatole, Phota, Photis, Praskevi, & Kyriaki
27
Prokopios the Confessor of Decapolis

Raphael of Brooklyn
28
Righteous John Cassian the Confessor

Basil the Confessor


Icons depicting the celebrated Saint, make great gifts for namedays, as do our custom-made Greek name mugs. Shop among our great collection of gift ideas at our store. We also have a great selection of greeting cards for birthdays, holidays, namedays and special occasions.

Hand Painted Icons Greek Name Mug Cups Classic Design Birthday / Humorous Message Greeting Cards in Greek Box of 12 B112
Gold and Silver Icons, and Hand-painted Icons
 
Greek Name Mug Cups Greeting Cards
 
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